Controlling diabetes depends largely on the individual

When hemoglobin, which is the carrier of oxygen in our blood, is exposed to sugar, some part of it changes permanently and becomes glycated (or sweetened). The more sugar in our blood, the more of the hemoglobin gets changed. By measuring what percentage of hemoglobin has become “sweet,” we can clearly know how high the sugar in the blood is for the entire three-month life span of the red blood cell. Most doctors check these levels at least two, and sometimes four, times a year. A normal glycated hemoglobin number is below 6. If a diabetic person wants to be as close to normal as possible, the number most doctors are striving for is 7.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.stamfordadvocate.com/news/article/Controlling-diabetes-depends-largely-on-the-3818831.php

Mississippi’s Diabetes walk/run is Sept. 14 in Gulfport’s Jones Park

90 in Gulfport. Registration is at 8:30 a.m. with the walk/run starting at 9 a.m. Participants are encouraged to dress as a favorite superhero and to have people pledge money to support their efforts.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.sunherald.com/2013/08/28/4909110/mississippis-diabetes-walkrun.html

In Type 2 Diabetes, Gut May ‘Taste’ Sugar Differently

Young found that the control of sweet taste receptors in the intestine of healthy adults allowed their bodies to regulate glucose uptake 30 minutes after the receptors detected glucose. However, people with type 2 diabetes had abnormalities that resulted in more rapid glucose uptake, according to the study published in a recent issue of the journal Diabetes. “When sweet taste receptors in the intestine detect glucose, they trigger a response that may regulate the way glucose is absorbed by the intestine. Our studies show that in diabetes patients, the glucose is absorbed more rapidly and in greater quantities than in healthy adults,” Young said. “This shows that diabetes is not just a disorder of the pancreas and of insulin — the gut plays a bigger role than researchers have previously considered,” he said.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.newsday.com/news/health/in-type-2-diabetes-gut-may-taste-sugar-differently-1.5973145

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